Tag Archives: Dutch

W, X, Y, and Z

My nephew Joseph asked me to teach him a little Dutch by making him a Dutch Alfabet. The easiest way for me to do this for him is through my blog. These are written for him, but hopefully anyone else reading this can learn a little Dutch! 

W is for Wagon.

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Wagon in Dutch means car.

In the Netherlands, the people try very hard to protect our environment, and one way they do this is by limiting the amount of time in a car. Instead, the Dutch tend to take public transportation, or more commonly, bikes.

When they do drive cars, however, they almost always drive a manual transmission car because these cars use gasoline that is not as harmful to the environment they are trying to preserve.

 

X is for nothing.

X is probably the most uncommon letter in the Dutch language and the only words that would start with X are words taken from other languages, such as x-ray or xylophone.

Y is also for practically nothing.

Y is another very uncommon letter and is usually, if not always, replaced with “ij”. One common and delicious word that starts with these two letters is “ijs” meaning ice. And by ice, they usually always mean ice cream 🙂

 

Z is for Zomer.

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My last Dutch word to give you is zomer, which means summer. I moved to the Netherlands in the summer and it is a beautiful season to be there. It rains a lot but when it’s not, everything is green and alive. The country is full of animals and there are endless activities are festivals to go to because the Dutch love to have a good time!

U and V

My nephew Joseph asked me to teach him a little Dutch by making him a Dutch Alfabet. The easiest way for me to do this for him is through my blog. These are written for him, but hopefully anyone else reading this can learn a little Dutch! 

U is for Uil

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Uil is the dutch word for Owl.

Where I lived in the Netherlands the Owl was the symbol for the town.

During Karnival, which is the five days before Lent starts, the Owl is unveiled to mark the beginning of the Karnival festivals.

On Fat Tuesday, the last day of Karnival, the owl is covered up again, telling everyone the festivities are over and lent has begun.

 

V is for Vuurwerk

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Vuurwerk is the dutch word for firework.

In the United States we have fireworks in the summer, and especially on the Fourth of July. In the Netherlands they save most of their fireworks for a different holiday: New Years Eve!

On New Years Eve, right when the clock strikes midnight, all the towns set off fireworks so if you are standing outside you can see fireworks from every direction!!

 

 

C is for…

My nephew Joseph asked me to teach him a little Dutch by making him a Dutch Alfabet. The easiest way for me to do this for him is through my blog. These are written for him, but hopefully anyone else reading this can learn a little Dutch!

C is for Carnaval.

Here the Carnaval colors are covering up the original colors of the Limburg flag
Here the Carnaval colors are covering up the original colors of the Limburg flag

Every year right before Lent there is a celebration called Carnaval. In America we usually just celebrate Mardi Gras on the tuesday right before Ash Wednesday, but in lots of places they have a celebration for a whole week.

In the Netherlands, especially the south, where I live, Carnaval is the biggest celebration of the year. They have parties and parades every day.

In the Netherlands each town has a special prince who is given the keys to the city, and he is in charge for all of Carnaval. There is a new prince every year, and he is elected a few weeks before Christmas. The prince carries around a special scepter, and everyone in the town tries to steal it from him. If they steal it from him, he has to buy them lots of beer. To make sure nobody steals his scepter, the prince picks a man from the town to be his body guard and keep his scepter safe.

In the Netherlands people dress up in funny costumes for Carnaval, and every day they try to dress in a different costume. It is kind of like Halloween, except they don’t go trick-or-treating.

During Carnaval in the Netherlands, the number 11 is very important, and so they try to start everything either in the 11th hour or on the 11th minute of the hour.

During Mardi Gras in America we usually decorate with the colors green, purple, and gold. In the Netherlands they decorate with green, red, and yellow. During Carnaval many people hang green, red, and yellow flags from their houses and they try to wear this colors when they dress up for the parties and parades.

During Carnaval when you see someone you know or if you are at a party, you don’t say hello to them, but instead you say “Alaaf!” and you salute them.

In our town the symbol of Carnaval is the owl. At the beginning of Carnaval they hang a crest on the town hall with an owl on it and they have a children’s parade with lots of music to tell everyone that Carnaval has started. At the end of Carnaval they take down the owl crest and they have fireworks to tell everyone that Carnaval is over.

Carnaval is full of funny music and silly costumes. It is one of the best times to be in the South of the Netherlands because there is always something fun happening.

365 Days of Joy: Week 18

I’ve decided to do 365 days of joy this year (inspired by the wonderful Raquel Kato, author of the Story of a Rose blog).  Some posts my be long, some may be only a sentence, but the important thing is finding joy in your everyday life, because there are so many things to be joyful about, and I tend to forget that. I’ll be posting one every week, and hopefully, along with joy, I can gain a little consistency in my life. 😉  So here we go, week 18!

8b39af641637a3c04ab962d6a45f7a4fUgh. I’ve started that awful process of searching for and applying to jobs for when I get back to Iowa at the end of July. If you are ever feeling too good about yourself, just job search for a little while and you will find soon find out how many things you are not qualified to do…trust me, you will be humbled very quickly. It’s hard staying positive in this process, and it’s hard sticking with it–I feel under qualified for every job I see, and it makes me feel like I will never find my true calling (if I even have one).  But, even if I feel under qualified and inexperienced, I still have to do it, because money is a real thing that I need, so I am giving it to God and trusting that He will help me find the courage and strength to continue this job search, and help me remember that I do have some nice things about me and so someone out there will hire me … hopefully!

4.30.15
Welcome to the world Bernadette Marguerite Kautzky! My dear dear friends Aaron and Alex Kautzky added a beautiful new member to their family! I can’t wait to get back to Iowa and meet the little princess!!

5.01.15
My sister Grace’s senior pictures went up online and they are beautiful! It’s so cool seeing her all grown up, but her pictures show how she still has all the joy she had as a child! You can see her pictures here!

5.02.15
My teenage past came back to me when I found Moulin Rouge playing on TV…I happily sang along to every song and teared up just like I did when I was 16.

5.03.15
Happy 5th birthday to my nephew Pepe!! This boy is so hilarious and sweet and we had a very entertaining Skype birthday call!

I made chicken wings for the kids and they we taken completely by surprised when I told them it was ok to eat with their fingers! They were cracking up the entire meal and it was so fun!
5.04.15
Went to a nearby thrift store for a little therapy on my half day off. The parents had been in Lourdes for the past five days, so it was nice to have a little time away after working double time.

5.05.15
I brought the celebration of Cinco de Mayo to the family here by making Tacos and drinking Corona! It was Muy Bueno!

Also, my host parents had gone to Lourdes with the Order of Malta and they brought me back an honorary pin from the Order because they while I am not apart of the Order, I helped them achieve the mission of the Order to serve those who are sick. It was a very special gift from them.

5.06.15
Put up my second Dutch Alfabet blog post! My nephew asked me to make him a Dutch Alfabet to teach him about the Netherlands, and so I’m using my blog as the median for that! You can check it out in the Dutch ABC’s category on my menu bar!

And that’s my week–I can’t believe I don’t have pictures to post…this has got to be a first!! Hope you all had a good week too and I’ll write again soon!

B is for…

My nephew Joseph asked me to teach him a little Dutch by making him a Dutch Alfabet. The easiest way for me to do this for him is through my blog. These are written for him, but hopefully anyone else reading this can learn a little Dutch! 

B is for Bitterballen.

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If you are in the Netherlands and you are looking for a quick snack, you should probably try some Bitterballen.

A Bitterbal is kind of like a fried meatball and you are supposed to eat it with mustard.

The Dutch like to eat these at parties, especially on big national holidays, like King’s Day, which we celebrated just a little while ago, on April 27.

I’ve never made them myself, but if you would like to try them at home you can find a recipe here!

If you are going to try them, they  go great with French fries and beer (or root beer for the kids 🙂 ).

A is for…

My nephew Joseph asked me to teach him a little Dutch by making him a Dutch Alfabet. The easiest way for me to do this for him is through my blog. These are written for him, but hopefully anyone else reading this can learn a little Dutch! 

A is for Aardappel

In Dutch aardappel means potato.

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Just like in Iowa, the Netherlands has lots of farms, and they grow lots of different plants. In Iowa we grow lots of different kinds of food, but mainly we grow corn, soy beans, and wheat. In the Netherlands they also grow lots of different foods too, but unlike Iowa, they grow a lot of potatoes.

Potatoes grow well in the Netherlands because it doesn’t get too hot nor too cold. Also, potatoes need a lot of water to grow and since the Netherlands have a lot of rivers, and it rains a lot, it is a perfect spot for potatoes to grow.

Just like the USA, the Netherlands send a lot of food to other people all over the world. And almost 25% of all the potatoes in the world come from the Netherlands, so the next time you eat a potato chip, you might be eating one that came all the way from the Netherlands.